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Shipyard Update: Ferry Sea Trials

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March 15, 2017 NYC Ferry

First we rolled the vessel out of the Horizon Shipbuilding’s covered facilities…

Live from the shipyard: watch out! Vessels on the move ⛴ #ferry #nycferry #shipyard

A post shared by NYC Ferry in NYC 2017 (@citywideferry) on

Then we wrapped the vessel in her final vinyl covering…

 

Then we splashed the vessel in the water…

Source: Workboat.com

Source: Workboat.com

And then we began the long awaited sea trials!

hny-citywide-ferry-horizon-yard-sea-trial_32516395884_o

This is the feeling our 100+ employees share after months of hard work constructing New York City’s new ferries, as the first Citywide Ferries hit the waters for their sea trials in Alabama early March, 2017.

The completion of each of the 16 total ferries arriving the New York City harbor in the summer of 2017 takes approximately 7.5 – 8.5 months, from start to finish. This month, our two shipyards – Horizon Shipbuilding (AL) and Metal Shark Boats(LA), begun sea trials on the first few vessels, which is the final leg of ship building before the vessels are ready to embark on their ride to their new home, New York City.

Each of the ferries that will be taking New Yorkers across routes between Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn for $2.75 per ride, and are projected to carry some 4.6million riders per year!

Metal shark

Metal shark

Metal shark

Metal shark

Metal shark

Metal shark

Hull 200, the very first vessel to begin construction in 2016, has come a long way since we first began covering the vessel construction stages in this blog. To backtrack and follow her ship building story, read our 100 Day Construction UpdateVessel Construction Showcase and End-of-Year Shipyard Review blogs!

Arriving in New York City this summer, each of the ferries that will be taking New Yorkers across routes between Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn for $2.75 per ride, take approximately 7.5 – 8.5 months to complete, and are projected to carry some 4.6million riders per year across 60 miles of waterways.

 

Photo Credit: Dave Pappas Creative Studio

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